The Black Eagle Inn (The Three Nations Triology) (Volume 3) by Christoph Fischer

The Black Eagle Inn by Christoph FischerBlurb

The Black Eagle Inn is an old established Restaurant and Farm business in the sleepy Bavarian countryside outside of Heimkirchen.  Childless Anna Hinterberger has fought hard to make it her own and keep it running through WWII. Religion and rivalry divide her family as one of her nephews, Markus has got her heart and another nephew, Lukas got her ear. Her husband Herbert is still missing and for the wider family life in post-war Germany also has some unexpected challenges in store.

Once again Fischer tells a family saga with war in the far background and weaves the political and religious into the personal. Being the third in the Three Nations Trilogy this book offers another perspective on war, its impact on people and the themes of nations and identity.

***TO BE RELEASED 15 OCTOBER 2013***

My Perspective

This is the third book in The Three Nations Trilogy. The story is about the Hinterberger family who own and run a farm and restaurant, named The Black Eagle Inn. Anna has been running it with an iron fist for most of her life however not having been blessed with children, she is constantly weighing up her nephews and nieces as potential heirs. It soon is clear that the choice lies between two of her nephews, Markus and Lukas. Unfortunately her best laid plans are ruined by the one she loves most.

I actually found this book quite sad. It wasn’t sad in that it made me cry – it didn’t. It was more in that you were sad that so many of the characters were blinded by their greed and that when things fell apart they were too proud to forgive.

The story was well written and there was a lot of development in the characters. My attention was caught from the beginning and the outcome of the story was quite unknown to me until the very end – i didn’t find it predictable at all.

I found the tone to be a little different compared to the first two books, The Luck of the Weissensteiners and Sebastian. They were more historical fiction whereas this was more of a family saga simply set in the past. There was a lot more actual politics in this book as well compared to the other two. The other two were political in the sense that they involved the war and all the politics surrounding that however this book had a lot of politics to do with area of Germany where the story was based. I actually found in a section towards the end of the book that it was a bit too political – i felt like i was being too heavily persuaded in certain views and opinions.

I also just wanted to say that i really appreciated one of Christoph’s notes at the end. The book had a lot of negative religious content and this is what he wrote – “Equally, the book is by no means intended to offend religiously devoted readers. Religion is not at all meant to be criticised, only misuse of it for other purposes.”

I would definitely recommend this book to those who like family saga and also historical fiction although it’s not technically in that genre.

This review is based on a digital ARC provided by the author.